Frederick Ferdinand Schafer Painting Catalog

Image index of unusual subjects--still life, cityscapes


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The first five paintings below are the only still lifes known to have been painted by Schafer. The first two are signed with a crisp Germanic block printing hand using an umlauted "a", suggesting that they may have been executed in Germany before Schafer's move to the United States and that they may have been academic exercises painted in Europe. Unfortunately, both of these paintings were lost in the Oakland fire of October 20, 1991. The third and fourth still lifes also appear to be signed by Schafer but with a different, block printing hand with rounded letters usually found on sketches. The fifth, larger still life is signed with his traditional block-letter printed hand.

The cityscape is the only one known, and one of the very few paintings by Schafer set in southern California. The scene with windmills and the woman walking toward a village are unique, though not exactly cityscapes. The mission painting is the only one currently known, though a 19th century auction advertisement suggests that there may be others. The girl feeding chickens is the only known domestic scene and the volcano painting is the only one known to be set in Hawai'i.


[photo]
[Floral still life: red rose]
[photo]
[Floral still life: white rose]
[photo]
[Still life with watermelon and banana]
[photo]
[Still life with fruit]
[photo]
[Still Life in plein air]
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Chinatown, Los Angeles, 1886
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[Windmills on a river]
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[Woman walking toward a village in winter]
[photo]
Carmel Mission, California
[photo]
[Girl feeding chickens]
[photo]
The Lake of Everlasting Fire, Sandwich Islands

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Feb 12, 2017, 16:48 MST